Relapse Prevention Worksheet

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Relapse Prevention is Valued at Azure Acres

Relapse does not start with the first drink or drug. It has a destructive, progressive behavioral pattern. The most commonly reported symptoms are:

Phase 1: Return of Denial
1. Concern about well being
2. Denial of the concern

Phase 2: Avoidance and Defensive Behavior
3. Believing “I’ll never drink again”
4. Worrying about others instead of yourself
5. Defensiveness
6. Compulsive behavior
7. Impulsive behavior
8. Tendency toward loneliness

Phase 3: Crisis Building
9. Tunnel vision
10 More depression
11. Loss of constructive planning
12. Plans begin to fail

Phase 4: Immobilization
13. Daydreaming and wishful thinking
14. Feelings that nothing can be solved
15. Immature wish to be happy

Phase 5: Confusion and Overreaction
16. Periods of confusion
17. irritation with friends
18. Easily angered

Phase 6: Depression
19. Irregular eating habits
20. Lack of desire to take action
21. Irregular sleeping habits
22. Loss of daily structure
23. Periods of deep depression
24. Irregular attendance at 12-Step meetings
25. Development of an “I don’t care” attitude
26. Open rejection of help
27. Dissatisfaction with life
28. Feelings of powerlessness and helplessness

Phase 7: Recognition of Loss of Control
29. Self-pity
30. Thoughts of social drinking/drug using
31. Conscious lying
32. Complete loss of self-confidence

Phase 8: Option Reduction
33. Unreasonable resentments
34. Discontinues all treatment
35. Overwhelming loneliness, frustration, anger and tension

Phase 9: Acute Relapse Episode
36 Loss of Behavioral Control
37. Acute relapse episode, marked by:

a. Degeneration in all life areas
b. Alcohol or drug use
c. Emotional collapse
d. Physical collapse
e. Stress related illness
f. Psychiatric illness
g. Suicide attempt
h. Accident proneness
i. Disruption of social structures

The alcoholic/addict can interrupt this pattern of behavior at any point prior to the total loss of control. He or she is responsible for all behavior and decisions that accompany relapse.

Based on “Dynamics of Relapse” by Terrance Gorski, M.A. – EAP Digest